Picea Breweriana | William Henry Brewer

Picea Breweriana is a species of extremely weeping trees and a native of South Western Oregon and Northwest California. It is found at altitudes of 1-2 thousand metres.

The immature cones of this tree are dark purple, fading to red and orange on maturation. A comparatively rare tree that is found growing in harsh and exposed ridgetop and is well separated from much of the faster growing trees such as the Douglas Fir. Because of its popularity as a garden specimen tree, many more are grown in gardens than in the wild.

Once again the evolutionary adaption of the weeping habit is directly the consequence of the snow fall found in the mountains of its native home lands.

The author of its botanical name was Sereno Watson, An American botanist, who chose to name the tree after an American geologist and botanist named William Henry Brewer who was born in New York State in 1848. He attended Yale University and studied in Europe at the University of Heidelberg, Germany.

In 1860 he was instrumental in a study of the geology of Northern California around the Gold Rush years and was also involved in a survey of Greenland in 1869. He then joined a famous expedition to Alaska in 1899.

He died at home in Connecticut in 1910.

In his honour, Mount Brewer in the Sierra Nevada’s is named after him.

from the series 18th Century Plant Collectors by Robert Kean 

Scot Plants Direct at Hedgehogs Nursery, Crompton Road, Southfield Industrial Estate, Glenrothes, Fife KY6 2SF

Kean and Able Landscaping

Kean & Able Landscaping

Kean & Able Landscaping

Kean & Able Landscaping

Kean & Able Landscaping

Scot Plants Direct at Hedgehogs Nursery, Crompton Road, Southfield Industrial Estate, Glenrothes, Fife KY6 2SF

About A Tree And A Man

A notable specimen in our collection is Pinus Wallichiana which is sometimes incorrectly seen in gardens as Pinus Griffithii. This pine has needles in bundles of five which have a distinctive drooping habit. The drooping nature of the leaves is an evolutionary adaption to the snow found at altitudes in Northern India. The tree shape is pyramidal and has a bluish colour and commonly known as the ‘Bhutan Pine’.

Specimens were collected in the Himalayan Foothills by Nathanial Wallich MD, who was a Danish Botanist and medical doctor. He was born in Copenhagen in 1786, the son of a merchant. He sailed for India in 1807.

Wallich found himself imprisoned by the British but was later paroled due to his scholarship.

At a later date he served with the British East India Company as an assistant surgeon to William Roxburgh. He also became an associate of the Royal Horticultural Society and his botanical specimens and herbarium collection became part of the collection at Kew Gardens.

He spent his later years in London at Kew, and died in 1854.

from the series 18th Century Plant Collectors by Robert Kean 

Scot Plants Direct at Hedgehogs Nursery, Crompton Road, Southfield Industrial Estate, Glenrothes, Fife KY6 2SF

Memorial Garden for the Plant Collectors of the 1800’s

Memorial Garden for the Plant Collectors of the 1800’s.

The inspiration for my current thoughts came from a trip to Portugal in the autumn of 2014. It started with ideas of making a tree collection, but also to commemorate the men of Scottish birth who found trees and plants in the wild and documented them.

A memorial to men like David Douglas and George Forrest who made their mark on the world by identifying important tree and plant species. The more I read of the exploits of these men and others I realized that they and I had something in common. A relationship with the royal Botanic Gardens in Edinburgh which had been an important starting point. The other point of similarity is that we all had to leave Scotland and go out into the world to find fame and fortune.

During the Victorian era the world had opened up for the plant collector as transport had developed to the extent that men of science could get to see the world as never before.

Celebrating David Douglas

David Douglas was born in the village of Scone near Perth. His most celebrated discovery was the Douglas Fir which is the most important tree of the American forestry industry to this day. He identified some 240 species of trees in North America and later died in tragic circumstances in Hawaii at the age of 37. The most notable species he named and introduced to cultivation are: Sitka Spruce (Christmas tree in UK), Sugar PineWestern White PineLodgepole PineMonterey PineNoble Fir. Over 80 species are named douglasii  in his honour and some Douglas Firs were planted near his graveside in Hawaii.

from the series 18th Century Plant Collectors by Robert Kean 

Scot Plants Direct at Hedgehogs Nursery, Crompton Road, Southfield Industrial Estate, Glenrothes, Fife KY6 2SF

Spain, Gran Canaria, Portugal, Tenerife & other parts

Booked a cruise this holiday and had our fingers crossed that all would be okay. The day started out not too bad, flights to South Hampton were on target, and we reached the boat! What a huge ship and what a lot of people. Royal Caribbean was so organised with the way we were ushered to our rooms, etc. Order was fantastic and awesome! Everything was amazing. The food was to gain weight for -all you could eat, and that was 24/7. The only bad thing was the last day they ran out of ‘sprinkles’ and vanilla ice cream!! Our tours we took in Spain, Gran Canaria, Portugal and Tenerife – all were amazing, organised and very knowledgeable! No Complaints – getting ready to book our next cruise… what a fantastic time. Hats off to Royal Caribbean – what a fantastic time! What a fantastic cruise!

Scot Plants Direct at Hedgehogs Nursery, Crompton Road, Southfield Industrial Estate, Glenrothes, Fife KY6 2SF